Skip to content Skip to footer

Tiny Things: Honey, I shrunk everything

A deep dive into the world of tiny things, from tiny homes to miniature cooking sets.

2 Minute Read

We started exploring tiny things by sharing a single Signalminiature cooking sets. We’ve now gone all-in on the tiny business, and found that it’s not just the miniature cooking set–it’s tiny 🏡, tiny 🎂, tiny 🌵, and just about tiny everything. We teased out over 50 tiny products and whether they’re on the 👍 or 👎.

Check out the full deck or continue reading to see how people are utilizing Youtube to capitalize on “tiny” trends––from miniature cooking to miniature creations–and how you can get in on the surprisingly unsaturated market.

Want the tiny version? Check out this spreadsheet.

Tiny Everything

  • There is a niche trend of people purchasing tiny things–not for their kids, but for their own enjoyment.
  • From tiny cooking supplies to miniature zen gardens to tiny Nutella jars, people are seeking out miniature-sized items.
  • Some are capitalizing by selling these items digitally, while others are using the power of social media to build channels around this trend.

Paying Premiums

Despite tiny things being inherently smaller, people tend to be willing to pay a premium on these niche products. 

50+ Miniature Products

Our search volume analysis indicates that people aren’t just purchasing miniature items, but they’re actively seeking them out. Among the 50 products that we analyzed, “tiny homes” currently have the most interest. See the search volume for over 50 additional keywords here.

Signals and Anti Signals

Take a look at each of the keywords and whether they’re trending up, down, or neutral in our Signals section. You’ll likely notice that certain types of products, like stationery, had their heyday a few years ago, while others are on the way up.

Localized Opportunities – Tiny Homes

We also performed an analysis on the search volume of tiny homes on a per capita basis, across some of America’s largest cities. Chattanooga, Tulsa, and Orlando topped the list. 

Micro Culture on the ‘Tube

People are not just buying tiny things. Others have leveraged the not-so-tiny trend on social media. In particular, on Youtube.

For example, some YouTubers are bringing in an estimated $1.5-3.8k per video, by jumping on the Tiny Home trend. And these YouTube estimations only include ad-related revenue coming directly from Youtube. It’s likely that these channels make more through donations, product placement, and affiliate marketing. 

Similarly, other YouTubers have tackled the miniature cooking space. Miniature Cusina is leading the pack, but newer channels like Jenny’s Mini Cooking Show are bringing in impressive views for many videos.

Others have taken on the tiny DIY space, where they teach people how to create anything from miniature houses to tiny kitchen cabinets.

There’s an opportunity to create a playbook and even outsource the production of these channels. There are still only a few players across each niche.

Opportunities

There’s still room for more people to tackle the tiny space. Here’s a rough playbook of how you can get involved:

  • Partner with a manufacturer and create Etsy (currently 786 “miniature items”) or Shopify store, selling DTC. Drive traffic through:
    • Facebook ads. 
    • Creating a “Tiny Things” Pinterest Board, like this or this.
    • Create a miniature things site, similar to this site. This space seems to be relatively wide open. This particular site ranks well for queries like “miniature things” despite only having 23 referring domains. Similarly, this site ranks on the query “mini things” due to its domain name, but doesn’t have an SSL. 
    • Many of the associated .co domains are available, while some .com are too. For example, mininutellajars.com is still available. (Monthly search volume of “mini nutella jars” is 2,400).
  • Many items are sold independently, but can easily be marketed together. For example: You could sell an entire tiny kitchen or a tiny meal kit.
  • You can also imagine the next wave of “tiny” products. For example, this company is doing $17k per month off of mini construction supplies.

1
Leave a Reply

avatar
1 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
1 Comment authors
Sasha Goldenson Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Sasha Goldenson
Guest
Sasha Goldenson

It’s the small things.